SeoulPodcast #42: English Radio

Feb 15, 2009 by

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The Jajeungna English Academy.  Our teachers are everywhere!  Just walk up to a random foreigner for a FREE English lesson.  They’re there for your convenience and nothing else.

PANELIST
Daniel Gray (Seoul Eats, TBS eFM)

MAIN TOPIC

Can English radio survive in Korea?

NEWS AND STUFF

대보름 Madness . . .
Four people die during traditional mountaintop grass-burning ceremony.

 

김연아 – Kim Yu-na, Just Set A World Record. Plus, she rocks.

National Police Agency classifies candlelight protest groups as ‘violent’ : National : Home

Coyner’s Comment: It would take the patience of Job, the wisdom of Salomon, or the impudence of Coyner to properly sort this out. What I can say from my observations, most of the folks associated with these demonstrations are not at all violent. However, there are genuine troublemakers out to make themselves and/or others martyrs at the hands of so_called police brutality, often employing tactics that seem more appropriate to a Monty Python sketch than political strategy. But if one can look pass the charade of this street political theatre, there are some fundamental problems that serve as a solemn base for much of these demonstrations. That is, even in better times, there has been a growing economic disparity between the wealthy and the rest of society, with many young middle class families becoming increasingly insecure as to their chances of hanging on to a middle class standard of living. In these times, the problems have become exasperated, of course, and many nonviolent or

 

http://briandeutsch.blogspot.com/2009/02/han-ji-yeon-is-proud-of-her-new-breasts.html

Taiwan, South Korea muzzle pessimistic brokers | Bye bye sell | The Economist

Cautiously optimistic about the KRW

Going down to 1,180 this year?

Won-dollar Swap to Be Extended to Oct.

Madagascar in Turmoil

I don’t want to say I told you so…

The JMS Cult: Jeong Myeong-seok & the Jesus Morning Star Cult
Rapist Cult Leader Appealing Conviction
Appeals Court Hands Cult Leader Four More Years

 

THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO WHAA?

“Fan Cafe” Supports Gunpo Serial Killer’s Rights

If You Fail Once, Try, Try 770 Times More

Be careful on those subway platforms, Drunk Man

(Not) Helping the Tourists

You Wouldn’t Have Understood a Word They Were Saying, Anyway
Don’t interrupt the foreigners when they’re eating, k thx.
This Headline Reminds Me Of A Story – Roboseyo’s guidelines for Koreans wanting free English practice from random strangers

Picture of the Day: Japan SDF’s Namdaemun Ice Sculpture

Get a New Cartoonist Already!
For a Second Time, Could Someone PLEASE Sack the KT’s Editorial Cartoonist? | The Marmot’s Hole

http://www.politicalcartoons.com/cartoon/14efd34c-8d3a-4c2e-9794-e1fbd8ec15d7.html

English Interview Tips for Koreans

EXPAT COMMUNITY

Public Service Announcement – Bubbly on sale at E-Mart

The Golden Klogs: Results are In!

 

English Teachers File Complaint with Human Rights Commission
National Human Rights Commission of Korea agrees with ATEK. E-2 regulations are discriminatory.

 

TIME WASTERS OF THE WEEK

Good Painter

http://www.iht.com/articles/2009/02/04/asia/painter.1-410764.php

http://www.iht.com/slideshows/2009/02/04/news/05PAINTER.php

 

Seoul2B

‘Tokyo!’ Trailer Deserves Its Exclamation Point

For Tokyo!, directors Michel Gondry, Leos Carax, and Bong Joon-ho teamed up, each creating a segment on the subject of the famed Japanese city

Using Mozilla Firefox in Korea

And add-on to make Korean sites work

Punk Legend Johnny Rotten Credited for Uptick in Sales of British Country Life Butter

Posh Nosh
PLUGS
Buy Us a Beer

The Supplier
(those who have given us swag)

John Kim

Life of the Party
(those who have donated at least $20)
Aaron Shearin
Naomi Neckoway
Chae An

Drinking Buddies
(those who have bought us beers)
Naomi Neckoway
Chae An
Aaron Shearin
Mimi Snider
Elton Fry
Therese MacSeain

Toast to Absent Friends
Michael White
Matthew Sellers
David Gearson
And others

GoToMyPC
Ex-Pat Living (The Korea Herald)
ESL Planet Recruiting
Twitter
SEOUL Magazine
ZenKimchi.com
KOTESOL

NEXT WEEK
Mark Russell (Korea Pop Wars, Korea Gig Guide, Pop Goes Korea)

MUSIC
Main Theme — Ben McPherson – “2wksnyc”
News — satya – “Silk Route Album Mix”
Things That Make You Go Whaa? — cjacks – “Candyland”
ExPat Community — Deyo – “Retro90210fun”
Time Wasters of the Week — EV Boyz – “Kickin’ It in Geumchon”
Jeremiah Fleming
Robin Stine
Jacques Grant
hairclub fo men
midliFeCrisis
DJWikidDJdUnity
Evil Twin
Kaveh
Deyo
Han Madang
Kim Il-gu
Devin Anderson

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  • Hwarangi

    About the F5 visa ~ I just filed a petition with the ministry of immigration and spoke to an official this week. If you are not married, and not an investor, she said the requirements are: 5 years continuous employment at the same company – if you change companies you'll have to start the five years again (even if you stay in country); plus you have to make 3x the average Korean salary of the previous year. i.e. about $60,000USD. Can't remember about the language requirement.

  • Hwarangi

    About the F5 visa ~ I just filed a petition with the ministry of immigration and spoke to an official this week. If you are not married, and not an investor, she said the requirements are: 5 years continuous employment at the same company – if you change companies you'll have to start the five years again (even if you stay in country); plus you have to make 3x the average Korean salary of the previous year. i.e. about $60,000USD. Can't remember about the language requirement.

  • Kevin R.

    Hello Joe and Jen: I'm almost finished listening (I listen during my exercise) and wanted to comment on the driver's license part.

    I never had a DL in the US, luckily I lived where I could ride bikes or take buses everywhere I needed. My first 4+ years here were much the same. My wife and I bought a car and that's what made me finally get a license. You say the process here is difficult, but I found it to be quite easy, but EXTREMELY long and time-intensive. Here are the simple steps:

    1) Go to the license center and sign up for the written test. They'll give you a book to study from, and it's all in English. You'll need to take an eye exam and a simple "physical" test like raising your arms and turning your head. You'll also have to sit through a 2+ hour safety course entirely in Korean with lots of gruesome videos and pictures of car crashes. Just bring your book and study while "listening" to the instructor.

    2.) Take the test. The test is 50 questions (but some are poorly worded). You need 40 correct to pass (I got 45).

    3.) Sign up at a driving hagwon for either the minimum 3 hours or the recommended 20 hours of course practice. This is good if you haven't driven before or in a very long time. The course can be difficult, but the instructors will tell you exactly how to pass by looking at where the car is in the lane and exactly when to turn the wheel, etc.

    4.) Take the course test either at the hagwon or at the center. The hagwon test is easier since you'll use the same car you practiced in so you're familiar with it.

    5.) Sign up for the road test. They'll give you a map showing the possible courses (about 5km each) that you could use. Go practice for 10 hours with a licensed driver.

    6.) Take the road test and pass with at least 70 for a Class 2 license or 80 for Class 1.

    7.) Get your license.

  • Kevin R.

    Hello Joe and Jen: I'm almost finished listening (I listen during my exercise) and wanted to comment on the driver's license part.

    I never had a DL in the US, luckily I lived where I could ride bikes or take buses everywhere I needed. My first 4+ years here were much the same. My wife and I bought a car and that's what made me finally get a license. You say the process here is difficult, but I found it to be quite easy, but EXTREMELY long and time-intensive. Here are the simple steps:

    1) Go to the license center and sign up for the written test. They'll give you a book to study from, and it's all in English. You'll need to take an eye exam and a simple "physical" test like raising your arms and turning your head. You'll also have to sit through a 2+ hour safety course entirely in Korean with lots of gruesome videos and pictures of car crashes. Just bring your book and study while "listening" to the instructor.

    2.) Take the test. The test is 50 questions (but some are poorly worded). You need 40 correct to pass (I got 45).

    3.) Sign up at a driving hagwon for either the minimum 3 hours or the recommended 20 hours of course practice. This is good if you haven't driven before or in a very long time. The course can be difficult, but the instructors will tell you exactly how to pass by looking at where the car is in the lane and exactly when to turn the wheel, etc.

    4.) Take the course test either at the hagwon or at the center. The hagwon test is easier since you'll use the same car you practiced in so you're familiar with it.

    5.) Sign up for the road test. They'll give you a map showing the possible courses (about 5km each) that you could use. Go practice for 10 hours with a licensed driver.

    6.) Take the road test and pass with at least 70 for a Class 2 license or 80 for Class 1.

    7.) Get your license.

  • Ian

    Hey, Joe! There are many great websites where you can download Korean subtitles for TV shows… You may like the following: http://www.gproject.co.kr/confluence/pages/viewpa

    btw- No need to apologize for the past few eps… I always enjoy listening!

  • Ian

    Hey, Joe! There are many great websites where you can download Korean subtitles for TV shows… You may like the following: http://www.gproject.co.kr/confluence/pages/viewpa

    btw- No need to apologize for the past few eps… I always enjoy listening!

  • John

    What's a juicy bar, what are they like inside, and do you have the address of any good ones? Juicy sounds good!

  • John

    What's a juicy bar, what are they like inside, and do you have the address of any good ones? Juicy sounds good!

  • John again

    Still listening …. and enjoying. Very interesting to hear about the mean bloggers on the Korea sites. What is it about the Internet that creates all these annoying haters? I stopped going on the Lonely Planet Cuba site because there were so many people that had to argue about everything, put everyone down, insult newbies for no reason, and think they are experts on everything. I worked and lived full time as a lawyer in Havana for more than a decade and I would have people who visit twice a year argue Cuban law with me. Ugghh! Getting frustrated just thinking about it. So I stay on the El Salvador site where almost everyone is polite and extremely helpful!
    I still want to know about juicy bars and do you have any pictures?

  • John again

    Still listening …. and enjoying. Very interesting to hear about the mean bloggers on the Korea sites. What is it about the Internet that creates all these annoying haters? I stopped going on the Lonely Planet Cuba site because there were so many people that had to argue about everything, put everyone down, insult newbies for no reason, and think they are experts on everything. I worked and lived full time as a lawyer in Havana for more than a decade and I would have people who visit twice a year argue Cuban law with me. Ugghh! Getting frustrated just thinking about it. So I stay on the El Salvador site where almost everyone is polite and extremely helpful!
    I still want to know about juicy bars and do you have any pictures?

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    This is from Galbi Jim
    http://wiki.galbijim.com/Juicy_Bars

    Juicy bars are the name given to bars that employ Korean, Russian, or Filipino girls, who will sit, drink, flirt, and frolick with you, as long as you keep buying them 'juicy drinks'. Depending on the place and time of night, juicy drinks can cost between 10,000 to 20,000 won. The role of these juicy girls is to keep you happy, horny, and buying more drinks for the establishment. If you want to go further and take the girl into the back or to a motel, its possible, but the cost of that varies. Expect no less than 100K and you can hear stories of drunk guys getting hosed for over 300K.

    The most popular areas to find juicy bars are around the army bases, such as Itaewon's Hooker Hill, Songtan, Camp Walker and Camp Henry in Daegu. Dongducheon has a vibrant juicy bar scene outside of Camp Casey, but the MPs have really cracked down up there and regularly threaten to place certain bars off-limits for GIs, if they suspect prostitution is going on. And as Army is big business in small little TDC, the bars usually don't mess around as much as they used to.

    Texas Street across from Busan Station is a popular juicy district known for its Russian women.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    This is from Galbi Jim
    http://wiki.galbijim.com/Juicy_Bars

    Juicy bars are the name given to bars that employ Korean, Russian, or Filipino girls, who will sit, drink, flirt, and frolick with you, as long as you keep buying them 'juicy drinks'. Depending on the place and time of night, juicy drinks can cost between 10,000 to 20,000 won. The role of these juicy girls is to keep you happy, horny, and buying more drinks for the establishment. If you want to go further and take the girl into the back or to a motel, its possible, but the cost of that varies. Expect no less than 100K and you can hear stories of drunk guys getting hosed for over 300K.

    The most popular areas to find juicy bars are around the army bases, such as Itaewon's Hooker Hill, Songtan, Camp Walker and Camp Henry in Daegu. Dongducheon has a vibrant juicy bar scene outside of Camp Casey, but the MPs have really cracked down up there and regularly threaten to place certain bars off-limits for GIs, if they suspect prostitution is going on. And as Army is big business in small little TDC, the bars usually don't mess around as much as they used to.

    Texas Street across from Busan Station is a popular juicy district known for its Russian women.

  • Kevin R.

    I have a question for the next podcast on Pop music…Can you give us some insight on the contracts and conditions for performers in the industry. Can you comment on the Jeon Ji-hyeon phone cloning issue? How much creative control do the artists actually have? I remember reading that JYP basically tells his singers that He makes all the decisions for the first 2 – 3 years b/c they don't know anything compared to him. Comments?

  • Kevin R.

    I have a question for the next podcast on Pop music…Can you give us some insight on the contracts and conditions for performers in the industry. Can you comment on the Jeon Ji-hyeon phone cloning issue? How much creative control do the artists actually have? I remember reading that JYP basically tells his singers that He makes all the decisions for the first 2 – 3 years b/c they don't know anything compared to him. Comments?

  • http://www.yrad.com/cs/ karl

    That video of the drunk falling off the platform is made funnier by virtue of the fact it's accompanied with a Maple Story like sound track.

    And frak Gaeta. May the gods frak him in Tartarus for 1,000 yahrens!

  • http://www.yrad.com/cs/ karl

    That video of the drunk falling off the platform is made funnier by virtue of the fact it's accompanied with a Maple Story like sound track.

    And frak Gaeta. May the gods frak him in Tartarus for 1,000 yahrens!

  • Chae

    I'm a native Korean and I've never found the podcast criticism of Koreans and the culture offensive. Granted, I'm a 1.5 gen (Born in Korea, moved to the US when I was 13) and perhaps my sensibilities are more US than Korean, but I tend to believe that vigorous criticism should underpin any progress, and in fact progress is all but impossible without frank, unvarnished criticism. And I think some of the best criticism comes from non-native perspective because less is taken for granted.

    Unfortunately, Koreans do not take direct criticism well, especially from foreigners. Maybe there needs to be a process to convert the criticism to something more oblique and indirect input more palatable to Korean ears, but the obvious concern is that such a process can be a self-defeating if the criticism is watered down too much.

    I don't know. Maybe I'm different. For example, I believe blind nationalism is one of few diseases that can be transmitted from dogs to human.

  • Chae

    I'm a native Korean and I've never found the podcast criticism of Koreans and the culture offensive. Granted, I'm a 1.5 gen (Born in Korea, moved to the US when I was 13) and perhaps my sensibilities are more US than Korean, but I tend to believe that vigorous criticism should underpin any progress, and in fact progress is all but impossible without frank, unvarnished criticism. And I think some of the best criticism comes from non-native perspective because less is taken for granted.

    Unfortunately, Koreans do not take direct criticism well, especially from foreigners. Maybe there needs to be a process to convert the criticism to something more oblique and indirect input more palatable to Korean ears, but the obvious concern is that such a process can be a self-defeating if the criticism is watered down too much.

    I don't know. Maybe I'm different. For example, I believe blind nationalism is one of few diseases that can be transmitted from dogs to human.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    I'm gong to steal that last line. I love it!

    I do try to be more conscious of us being too negative at times. This is a country we love so deeply, and we have this overwhelming quixotic desire to want it to grow to its potential.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    I'm gong to steal that last line. I love it!

    I do try to be more conscious of us being too negative at times. This is a country we love so deeply, and we have this overwhelming quixotic desire to want it to grow to its potential.

  • Chae

    Forgot to mention…

    I don't mean to say that there is no direct criticism in Korea, but that is almost exclusively limited to a very directly linear, hierarchical situation. A "sunbae" could criticize his "hwubae" privately or semi-privately or a department head could criticize office drones directly under him in his own department. However, a department head would not criticize the drones in other department unless he doesn't mind feuding with the other department head, and perhaps inviting direct criticism of his own from others.

    So when a foreigner criticizes Korea or Koreans, many Koreans will slip into this linear, hierarchical mode where they believe this foreigner is assuming a superior socio-economic status, and the resentment and anger can overwhelm any merits in the criticism. It's the same resentment and anger they would feel if their direct superior had criticized them, but now there is no social and cultural breaker fuse.

    Similarly, I think an average Korean would react very differently to a smartly dressed, dignified-sounding, professor-looking foreigner opining on a national TV program about some issues he had found with Korea and a young, messy haired, bearded foreigner wearing t-shirts and cargo pants, lugging a backpack on the subway dishing out crap about Korea, even if the first guy was actually a shaved monkey and the other was a Rhodes scholar.

  • Chae

    Forgot to mention…

    I don't mean to say that there is no direct criticism in Korea, but that is almost exclusively limited to a very directly linear, hierarchical situation. A "sunbae" could criticize his "hwubae" privately or semi-privately or a department head could criticize office drones directly under him in his own department. However, a department head would not criticize the drones in other department unless he doesn't mind feuding with the other department head, and perhaps inviting direct criticism of his own from others.

    So when a foreigner criticizes Korea or Koreans, many Koreans will slip into this linear, hierarchical mode where they believe this foreigner is assuming a superior socio-economic status, and the resentment and anger can overwhelm any merits in the criticism. It's the same resentment and anger they would feel if their direct superior had criticized them, but now there is no social and cultural breaker fuse.

    Similarly, I think an average Korean would react very differently to a smartly dressed, dignified-sounding, professor-looking foreigner opining on a national TV program about some issues he had found with Korea and a young, messy haired, bearded foreigner wearing t-shirts and cargo pants, lugging a backpack on the subway dishing out crap about Korea, even if the first guy was actually a shaved monkey and the other was a Rhodes scholar.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    And as much as I try, that's the hardest concept for me to wrap my mind around.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ZenKimchi ZenKimchi

    And as much as I try, that's the hardest concept for me to wrap my mind around.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Working now.

  • rob

    i don’t think this show is working

  • rob

    i don’t think this show is working

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Working now.