SeoulPodcast #19: Top Ten Things to See and Do in Korea (free download)

Sep 6, 2008 by

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PANELIST
Jennifer Flinn (Fatman Seoul, Bomb English)

MAIN TOPIC

Korea’s Top Ten

What did you do on your summer vacation? Why?

Even with Effort, Korea just not Popular with Foreign Tourists

Ten Things to See in Korea

JENNIFER’S LIST

10. Watch someone else eat live octopus
9. Watch a pansori
8. Dinosaur footprints in Goseong *
7. Crash a wedding at a wedding hall
6. Bomunsa Temple and Seokguram Grotto on Buddha’s Birthday *
5. Namsan Mountain in Gyeongju
4. Byeongsan Seowon Confucian Academy in Andong
3. All the national museums
2. Anapji Pond at night
1. Watch a shaman ceremony

STAFFORD’S LIST

10. Suwon’s Hwaseong Fortress
9. Seoraksan Mountain
8. The Island of Uido
7. Anywhere in Jeollanam-do
6. Bulguksa and Seokguram Grotto *
5. The DMZ
4. Seven Luck Casino
3. Dinosaur footprints *
2. Submarines at Seoguipo
1. Woljeongsa Temple

JOE’S LIST

10.  Yongsan Electronics Market
9.    Myeong-dong on Christmas Eve or Apgujeong’s Rodeo Street
8.    The DMZ *
7.    Seoul from any high place (Namsan Tower, mountain)
6.    Folk Village in Suji
5.    Changdeokgung Palace
4.    Insa-dong’s hidden alleys
3.    Korea National Museum *
2.    Cheonggyecheon River at night
1.    The city of Gyeongju *

* Some overlap with other lists

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http://www.seoulpodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/59637_25998_5513.jpg

Ten Things to Do in Korea

JENNIFER’S LIST

10. Convince an old man to give you a ride on his motorbike
9. Korean booking club *
8. Innertube down Cheonggyecheon River
7. Ruefully mock a Korean child by refusing to speak in English
6. Ride a yellow bus around Namsan Mountain
5. Eat a live octopus
4. Jjimjilbang (Sauna) and get an exfoliating skin scrub *
3. Check out www.BombEnglish.com or www.FatManSeoul.com
2. Sleep in a nasty yeogwan
1. A Korean

STAFFORD’S LIST

10. Rooms (Jjimjilbang, Noraebang, DVD Bang) *
9. Go shopping at Dongdaemun Market
8. Eat all the food samples at the Lotte Department Store in Myeong-dong
7. Get kicked out of Lotte Department Store
6. Go on the psycho Chucky doll ride at Everland
5. Get into a fight with a drunk ajosshi while eating odeng
4. Climb over the tanks and planes at the Korean War Museum
3. Korean booking club
2. Steal a Korean flag from a lamppost on August 15th
1. Go fishing at the Cheonggyecheon River

JOE’S LIST

10. Sunday at the Seoul Racecourse Park
9. Korean nightclub *
8. Taekwondo

How to Participate in the Taekwondo Experiential Program for Foreigners

The Taekwondo experiential program for foreigners is held three times a day (10:30, 13:30, and 15:30, except Mondays) in Gyeonghuigung Palace until December. Each 90-minute session accommodates up to 40 people.
The sessions each offer a different program: the 10:30 session covers basic taekwondo moves; the 13:30 session, self-defense techniques; and the 15:30 session, breaking techniques. Participants can choose one or more sessions or take part in all three. Everyone receives a taekwondo certificate and badge upon completion of the session.

Visitors wishing to participate can visit the website of Kukkiwon (www.kukkiwon.or.kr) to reserve online. The price is 15,000 per program. Gyeonghuigung Palace can be reached via Subway Line 5, Gwanghwamun Station, exit 7. It is a 15-minute walk from the subway station.

7. All-nighter in Hongdae
6. Temple stay
Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism
www.templestaykorea.com
5. Hike a mountain (Seoraksan) *
4. Noraebang *
3. Experience Chuseok
2. Jjimjilbang (especially charcoal sauna) *
1. Go to a country restaurant/see the countryside

* Some overlap with other lists

PLUGS
Survey
**Donations**
Ex-Pat Living (The Korea Herald)
ESL-Planet
SEOUL Magazine
ZenKimchi.com
KOTESOL

NEXT WEEK
Topic: Kamsa Haseyo, Mr. Roboseyo
Panelists: Rob Ouwehand (Roboseyo)

MUSIC CREDITS
Main Theme — Ben McPherson – “2wksnyc”
Tripudio
Bit Rationale
Victor Stellar
DJ Topshelf
High Alert Status
Jack Jeffery
Musicos Unidos de Latino America
Deyo
Conconquidore Truidore
Everyday Jones
Adam Schmitt
David Gielan
Joe Sibol
Sundown Caffeine
Outside
Tea Leaves
Crush
The Kokoon

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  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    Heh heh heh. “I don’t want any gift sets of spam for chusok, now.”

    best line.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    Heh heh heh. “I don’t want any gift sets of spam for chusok, now.”

    best line.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    ps: you can put the y-shits picture from my blog up on your site.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    ps: you can put the y-shits picture from my blog up on your site.

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  • Robert

    Things to do in Korea: Listen to Seoul Podcast and be amazed when you actually get to see native Korean wildlife. Just got home at midnight on Saturday. Walking across my dark deserted campus to my apartment and what do I see a few meters away? Two brown raccon-like creatures. A quick Wiki search identified them as raccoon dogs. Stuff like this continues to amaze me, that no matter how developed and constructed Korea is, life manages to survive and thrive amongst us.

  • Robert

    Things to do in Korea: Listen to Seoul Podcast and be amazed when you actually get to see native Korean wildlife. Just got home at midnight on Saturday. Walking across my dark deserted campus to my apartment and what do I see a few meters away? Two brown raccon-like creatures. A quick Wiki search identified them as raccoon dogs. Stuff like this continues to amaze me, that no matter how developed and constructed Korea is, life manages to survive and thrive amongst us.

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  • http://briandeutsch.blogspot.com Brian

    Anywhere in Jeollanam-do?

    Cop

    Out

    Heh. The most glaring omission is “play in a love motel.” I see “cheap yeogwan” there, but a good, quality love motel is a work of art.

  • http://briandeutsch.blogspot.com Brian

    Anywhere in Jeollanam-do?

    Cop

    Out

    Heh. The most glaring omission is “play in a love motel.” I see “cheap yeogwan” there, but a good, quality love motel is a work of art.

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    I hadn’t realized that we were all so biased towards Gyeongsangdo! That’s where I used to live, so of course I have to talk up the 고향, right? But had I known, I might have mentioned the tea fields at Boseong, or Sogwangsa, or the bamboo forest at Damyang. But with your superior blog, Brian, do we really need to?

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    I hadn’t realized that we were all so biased towards Gyeongsangdo! That’s where I used to live, so of course I have to talk up the 고향, right? But had I known, I might have mentioned the tea fields at Boseong, or Sogwangsa, or the bamboo forest at Damyang. But with your superior blog, Brian, do we really need to?

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    plus, aren’t I already in enough trouble with this list? What would respectable folk think of me if I added “love motel” on top of “ratty yeogwan” . . .? oh, nevermind.

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    plus, aren’t I already in enough trouble with this list? What would respectable folk think of me if I added “love motel” on top of “ratty yeogwan” . . .? oh, nevermind.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Too fuckin’ awesome! Really?

  • Terry

    Last summer I participated in Tae Kwon Do for foreigners, (JOE’S LIST #8. Taekwondo) It was really good. After that I found a local dojang and joined. I recently received my 1st degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do, 1 dan.

  • Terry

    Last summer I participated in Tae Kwon Do for foreigners, (JOE’S LIST #8. Taekwondo) It was really good. After that I found a local dojang and joined. I recently received my 1st degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do, 1 dan.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Too fuckin’ awesome! Really?

  • http://briandeutsch.blogspot.com Brian

    I’m only half way through the episode, but it’s pretty good. I actually enjoyed the, um, dirt on Seoul more than the list so far. I have a couple of surprising ommissions that I’ll probably get to posting tonight or tomorrow. But nice job. The Chosun Bimbo is a good co-host, and Jennifer you had a lot of good things on your list. I especially want to see Gyeongju’s Namsan now.

  • http://briandeutsch.blogspot.com Brian

    I’m only half way through the episode, but it’s pretty good. I actually enjoyed the, um, dirt on Seoul more than the list so far. I have a couple of surprising ommissions that I’ll probably get to posting tonight or tomorrow. But nice job. The Chosun Bimbo is a good co-host, and Jennifer you had a lot of good things on your list. I especially want to see Gyeongju’s Namsan now.

  • http://jackielbolen.blogspot.com/ Jackie

    Love your podcast…I’m a faithful listener every week. It’s made some bus and subway rides much more entertaining. Laughing out loud to myself!

    The dinosaur footprints…who knew? I’ve been here for over 3 years and traveled almost everywhere but I haven’t heard anything about them until your recent episode.

  • http://jackielbolen.blogspot.com/ Jackie

    Love your podcast…I’m a faithful listener every week. It’s made some bus and subway rides much more entertaining. Laughing out loud to myself!

    The dinosaur footprints…who knew? I’ve been here for over 3 years and traveled almost everywhere but I haven’t heard anything about them until your recent episode.

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Man, you have to check out the dinosaur footprints. There’s also a set of caves and a few unique rock formations on the same beach, so you get a lot of bang for your travel buck. I suggest taking a bus out there and then going all the way to the village where the museum is and staying the night in a minbak (the main town really has only one thing to offer: some very spectacular tomb mounds, but since they’re near the bus station it’s easy to catch them on the way in or out of town) I only found out about them because I am (not so) secretly a total dork.
    Brian, you haven’t seen NAMSAN?!?!?! Go, go NOW!

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Man, you have to check out the dinosaur footprints. There’s also a set of caves and a few unique rock formations on the same beach, so you get a lot of bang for your travel buck. I suggest taking a bus out there and then going all the way to the village where the museum is and staying the night in a minbak (the main town really has only one thing to offer: some very spectacular tomb mounds, but since they’re near the bus station it’s easy to catch them on the way in or out of town) I only found out about them because I am (not so) secretly a total dork.
    Brian, you haven’t seen NAMSAN?!?!?! Go, go NOW!

  • Jim

    The martial art at that temple in Kyungju is called Sun moo do.

  • Jim

    The martial art at that temple in Kyungju is called Sun moo do.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Yet we have all these gift sets of Spam at Chuseok…

    My feeling on this is that the Seoul gov’t official had little grasp of world cuisine. The world’s best foods (ex: American soul food, French provincial peasant cuisine, Italian pizza) come from people living off of nasty scraps and making something good from them. Budae Jjigae is a 20th century example of the creativity of hunger.

    I’ll bet in thirty to a hundred years it would be considered high cuisine, like all the other traditional peasant foods in the world have become.

  • Chae

    I had a laugh about the budaejjigae incident. And I may be able to shed some light on why the Seoul gov’t officials are so sensitive about that. This comes directly from my grandmother who lived through the Japanese occupation and the Korean war. Budaejjigae did in fact come from US army rations. But if you’re thinking otherwise unmolested surplus cans of spam and sausages generously donated to proud but practical Koreans, then you would be very far off. My grandmother told me with a perfectly calm and matter-of-fact demeanor that she and many other Koreans would comb through army base garbage to collect the ingredients for the jjigae. Often the “ingredients” would be in such poor shape that the only way to make them palatable was to throw them in a spicy soup with kimchee and boil the hell out of it.

    See, it’s not just about a reminder of Koreans being poor. It’s about Koreans being a hair width from starving to death, destitute and entirely stripped of anything but that last shred of will that is required to live in such a condition.

    If you tell most Koreans, especially younger ones, that this is how their precious budaejjigae started, they would probably deny it. And it may very well be that they were never told about it and couldn’t conceive it. But the older ones wouldn’t. Or at least, they would deny it but you could tell they were lying. I for one am glad that my grandparents were resourceful enough to keep my father fed and alive.

    So next time you guys gather around a merrily boiling pot of budaejjigae, remember its even humbler, untold origin behind its unglamorous (to be charitable) official beginning.

    On a similar note, I hear that British are rather fond of Spam even now.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ Joe

    Yet we have all these gift sets of Spam at Chuseok…

    My feeling on this is that the Seoul gov’t official had little grasp of world cuisine. The world’s best foods (ex: American soul food, French provincial peasant cuisine, Italian pizza) come from people living off of nasty scraps and making something good from them. Budae Jjigae is a 20th century example of the creativity of hunger.

    I’ll bet in thirty to a hundred years it would be considered high cuisine, like all the other traditional peasant foods in the world have become.

  • http://www.gomushingirl.blogspot.com Jennifer

    Thanks Jim!
    And I just realized a major error of mine …
    for #6 Things to See I should have said and indicated Bongamsa, not Bomunsa! Bongamsa is in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do, and is the temple only open on Buddha’s Birthday. There are two Bomunsa’s of interest – both the one on Gangwhado that Joe’s linked to, and the one in Seongbuk-gu, Seoul that’s the head of the Bomun Order, aka the world’s only order of female Buddhist monks (they’re 스님, not 비구니!)

  • http://www.gomushingirl.blogspot.com Jennifer

    Thanks Jim!
    And I just realized a major error of mine …
    for #6 Things to See I should have said and indicated Bongamsa, not Bomunsa! Bongamsa is in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do, and is the temple only open on Buddha’s Birthday. There are two Bomunsa’s of interest – both the one on Gangwhado that Joe’s linked to, and the one in Seongbuk-gu, Seoul that’s the head of the Bomun Order, aka the world’s only order of female Buddhist monks (they’re 스님, not 비구니!)

  • Robert

    Top 10 things to do and see in Korea. I know I should have a top 10 things to do and a top 10 things to see list, but I’m lazy and am amalgamtaing.

    #10 Experience other countries’ cultures. I am from a provincial capital in Canada, but if you live anywhere where there is a large foreigner population Korea can truly be really metropolitan. I agree with Joe when he said many podcasts back that this is truly the hub of the world. Anything you could possibly want is here in Korea. I have discovered the joys of Uzbekii, Chinese, Vietnamese, Mexican, Turkish, Pakistanni, Irish, and Italian(fusion) foods here. One day I’ll work up he nerve to try some of the African or Australian restaurants. Korean food is frikkin awesome, but why only limit yourself to Korean food while you’re here?

    #9 Tour Korea. I’m sick and tired of one-year contract holders who spend their one year here “working” and drinking and can’t wait for their vacations to go explore some “real” Asian culture. I’ve lived here for 8 years and have spent my vacations either back home in Canada or exploring Korea. Don’t be dismissive of Korea. Just cause you work for a hogwan and get drunk every weekend at the expat bar doesn’t mean you have experienced Korea. Explore! Be brave! Spend that next week off in Korea and see what it has to offer, because it really does have a lot.

    #8 Show the newbie Korean culture. Not the expat bar. Not where you think the best kal-bi or sam-gyup-sal restaurant is. Show them your favorite museum. Show them your favorite mountain, temple, park, palace, or view.

    #7 Eat where Koreans eat and drink.

    #6 The War Memorial/Museum near Itaewon.

    #5 Take a Korean on a tour of Itaewon/Ansan Asiantown/wherever Koreans think of as dirty and nasty because a gazillion years ago some foreigner killed a Korean there. Show a Korean why you love that place.

    #4 Hike a mountain. Get off of the paved two-lane road that takes you to the top. In fact, if in any way it is possible for you to drive to the top of the mountain, pick the one next to it! Take the smallest most overgrown path you can find, or blaze your own!

    #3 Dongdaemoon flea market.

    #2 Soju hangover

    And the number one thing to do in Korea???

    : a Korean.
    (thanks Jenn!)

  • Robert

    Top 10 things to do and see in Korea. I know I should have a top 10 things to do and a top 10 things to see list, but I’m lazy and am amalgamtaing.

    #10 Experience other countries’ cultures. I am from a provincial capital in Canada, but if you live anywhere where there is a large foreigner population Korea can truly be really metropolitan. I agree with Joe when he said many podcasts back that this is truly the hub of the world. Anything you could possibly want is here in Korea. I have discovered the joys of Uzbekii, Chinese, Vietnamese, Mexican, Turkish, Pakistanni, Irish, and Italian(fusion) foods here. One day I’ll work up he nerve to try some of the African or Australian restaurants. Korean food is frikkin awesome, but why only limit yourself to Korean food while you’re here?

    #9 Tour Korea. I’m sick and tired of one-year contract holders who spend their one year here “working” and drinking and can’t wait for their vacations to go explore some “real” Asian culture. I’ve lived here for 8 years and have spent my vacations either back home in Canada or exploring Korea. Don’t be dismissive of Korea. Just cause you work for a hogwan and get drunk every weekend at the expat bar doesn’t mean you have experienced Korea. Explore! Be brave! Spend that next week off in Korea and see what it has to offer, because it really does have a lot.

    #8 Show the newbie Korean culture. Not the expat bar. Not where you think the best kal-bi or sam-gyup-sal restaurant is. Show them your favorite museum. Show them your favorite mountain, temple, park, palace, or view.

    #7 Eat where Koreans eat and drink.

    #6 The War Memorial/Museum near Itaewon.

    #5 Take a Korean on a tour of Itaewon/Ansan Asiantown/wherever Koreans think of as dirty and nasty because a gazillion years ago some foreigner killed a Korean there. Show a Korean why you love that place.

    #4 Hike a mountain. Get off of the paved two-lane road that takes you to the top. In fact, if in any way it is possible for you to drive to the top of the mountain, pick the one next to it! Take the smallest most overgrown path you can find, or blaze your own!

    #3 Dongdaemoon flea market.

    #2 Soju hangover

    And the number one thing to do in Korea???

    : a Korean.
    (thanks Jenn!)

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Man, I’m never gonna live that down, am I? ^^;;;

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Man, I’m never gonna live that down, am I? ^^;;;

  • Robert

    Nope!

    But ya know, by “do” a Korean, I don’t just mean sex. Sex itself can be informative. I remember my first Korean girlfriend and in the throes of passion she put her arms over her head and I had to stop because I was so fascinated by her underarm hair. (Most Korean women shave neither their pits or their legs during winter.) If you’re a single man or woman, then I highly recommend dating or going out with a Korean. I love Korean culture, and being in a relationship with a Korean definetely has opened my mind and allowed me to experience Korean modern culture and society a lot more. Most western women are very dismissive of Korean men, but they can be some of the sweetest boyfriends you’ll ever meet.

  • Robert

    Nope!

    But ya know, by “do” a Korean, I don’t just mean sex. Sex itself can be informative. I remember my first Korean girlfriend and in the throes of passion she put her arms over her head and I had to stop because I was so fascinated by her underarm hair. (Most Korean women shave neither their pits or their legs during winter.) If you’re a single man or woman, then I highly recommend dating or going out with a Korean. I love Korean culture, and being in a relationship with a Korean definetely has opened my mind and allowed me to experience Korean modern culture and society a lot more. Most western women are very dismissive of Korean men, but they can be some of the sweetest boyfriends you’ll ever meet.

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Hm, is your grandmother available to interview? I’ve been working on some of the folklore about budaejjigae, and frankly, I’ve become very skeptical of the “digging around in the trash” story, so I’d be very interested in a first-hand account of it. I’d have to say that this is actually the most common story I’ve heard of it, young and old – it’s a very popular account.

  • http://www.bombenglish.com Jennifer

    Hm, is your grandmother available to interview? I’ve been working on some of the folklore about budaejjigae, and frankly, I’ve become very skeptical of the “digging around in the trash” story, so I’d be very interested in a first-hand account of it. I’d have to say that this is actually the most common story I’ve heard of it, young and old – it’s a very popular account.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    I tried to write this list without any crossover (or at least not much) of what’s already on the list.

    Here are mine:

    In no particular order:

    10. coex at 1am when the late movie gets out and the entire rest of the mall is abandoned. . . but you can wander around wherever you like

    9. Pukhakdong, the neighbourhood between inwang mountan and pukak mountain, and the trail up inwang mountain, as accessed through the neighbourhood on the north side of inwang mountain.

    8. new year’s eve at boshingak

    7. lantern festival at Buddha’s birthday; especially tapgol park after dark that night.

    6. either a pro gamers (online gaming) league competition, or a b-boy competition

    5. (for tourists) the seoul city bus tour (for people living here) the performances and demnostration in Namsangol folk village on Chusok, or at least the traditional performance in Jung-dong theater beside Deoksugung.

    4. the look on a Korean’s face when YOU ask THEM “where are you from?”

    3. at least two UNESCO world heritage sites located outside of Seoul

    2. the Korean food at a busy restaurant where you are the only person there under 60.

    1. Jongmyo Park on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon in summer, spring, or fall: go dancing with the old people, and watch them just hanging out.

    ten things to do:

    10. attend a protest, whether you agree or not (but if you disagree, shut up, and stay away from the anti-american ones, dummy.)

    9. Speak gibberish to a person who wants a free English lesson. . . bonus points if you’re approached whilst naked, in a sauna.

    8. Get a letter to the editor or an op-ed column published in Korea Herald, Korea Times, Joongang Daily (inside the International Herald Tribune), or a magazine.

    7. Dance with an ajumma. Dance LIKE an ajumma. Boat tours are somehow the best place to do this.

    6. Skinny dip in a pond on a hiking mountain trail, when you’re really effing hot.

    5. Get away with something because you’re not from around here.

    4. In fresh snow, slide down the steep hills in Olympic Park’s Mongchontosong Fortress on your butt. Be careful about where you do this, because some of the hillsides have jutting branches. Try the ones towards the south side, in the direction away from the Han River.

    3. Play in the water fountains, either in City Hall Plaza, or Seoul Forest.

    2. play gostop or yutnori with a korean family, and/or learn three Korean drinking games (sam yuk ku is a good start, as is kong kong chil bang!; at least one must involve variations on rock, scissor, paper)

    1. learn to read hangul. preferably in your first month.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    I tried to write this list without any crossover (or at least not much) of what’s already on the list.

    Here are mine:

    In no particular order:

    10. coex at 1am when the late movie gets out and the entire rest of the mall is abandoned. . . but you can wander around wherever you like

    9. Pukhakdong, the neighbourhood between inwang mountan and pukak mountain, and the trail up inwang mountain, as accessed through the neighbourhood on the north side of inwang mountain.

    8. new year’s eve at boshingak

    7. lantern festival at Buddha’s birthday; especially tapgol park after dark that night.

    6. either a pro gamers (online gaming) league competition, or a b-boy competition

    5. (for tourists) the seoul city bus tour (for people living here) the performances and demnostration in Namsangol folk village on Chusok, or at least the traditional performance in Jung-dong theater beside Deoksugung.

    4. the look on a Korean’s face when YOU ask THEM “where are you from?”

    3. at least two UNESCO world heritage sites located outside of Seoul

    2. the Korean food at a busy restaurant where you are the only person there under 60.

    1. Jongmyo Park on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon in summer, spring, or fall: go dancing with the old people, and watch them just hanging out.

    ten things to do:

    10. attend a protest, whether you agree or not (but if you disagree, shut up, and stay away from the anti-american ones, dummy.)

    9. Speak gibberish to a person who wants a free English lesson. . . bonus points if you’re approached whilst naked, in a sauna.

    8. Get a letter to the editor or an op-ed column published in Korea Herald, Korea Times, Joongang Daily (inside the International Herald Tribune), or a magazine.

    7. Dance with an ajumma. Dance LIKE an ajumma. Boat tours are somehow the best place to do this.

    6. Skinny dip in a pond on a hiking mountain trail, when you’re really effing hot.

    5. Get away with something because you’re not from around here.

    4. In fresh snow, slide down the steep hills in Olympic Park’s Mongchontosong Fortress on your butt. Be careful about where you do this, because some of the hillsides have jutting branches. Try the ones towards the south side, in the direction away from the Han River.

    3. Play in the water fountains, either in City Hall Plaza, or Seoul Forest.

    2. play gostop or yutnori with a korean family, and/or learn three Korean drinking games (sam yuk ku is a good start, as is kong kong chil bang!; at least one must involve variations on rock, scissor, paper)

    1. learn to read hangul. preferably in your first month.

  • http://www.gomushingirl.blogspot.com Jennifer

    Dude, we need a go-stop club! Man, I love that game!

  • http://www.gomushingirl.blogspot.com Jennifer

    Dude, we need a go-stop club! Man, I love that game!

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  • http://profile.yahoo.com/TK2O6O3T7USB47OOIR76L5RXYU/ Prateek Panchal

    Hey very interesting post…..Korea is one of the beautiful place…..I wish i visit it….Cheers!!!!

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